Tag Archive | music

#MusicMonday – Janet Jackson – Alright

This delightful 1990 Janet Jackson video features her idols Cyd Charisse, The Nicholas Brothers, and Cab Calloway

Speaking of The Nicholas Brothers, check out this awesome performance that Fred Astaire called “the greatest dance number ever filmed”:

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#MusicMonday I Got You Babe – Cher with Beavis & Butthead

Cher is a 2018 Kennedy Center Honoree along with Philip Glass, Reba McEntire, and Wayne Shorter.  In tribute to her selection, I present this cover of ex-husband Sonny Bono’s I Got You Babe featuring Cher and Beavis & Butthead.

Butthead: “Is it true that you used to be, like uh, married to that Bono dude?”

Cher: “Bono. Sonny Bono”

#MusicMonday Keely Smith “When Day is Done”

Three months ago, I promised a feature on Keely Smith, who died on December 16, 2017.

 

See the source image

Keely Smith

 

This video is taken from the Frank Sinatra show in 1958. It starts with wise-cracking between Sinatra and Keely Smith’s then husband Louis Prima. Keely sings “When Day is Done.”

 

While she put away the crinolines, she wore the same haircut throughout her life. 🙂

#MusicMonday France Gall #France

France Gall was a French pop singer, one of the yé-yé girls of the 1960s, which included Françoise Hardy and Sylvie Vartan. She died earlier this month, on January 7, 2018, of an infection from cancer. She was age 70.

She shot to prominence when she won the Eurovision Song Contest in 1965, singing Serge Gainsbourg’s song Poupée de cire, poupée de son (wax doll, rag doll):

Wikipedia dissects the meaning of the lyrics of Poupée de cire, poupée de son: for example, poupée de son can also be interpreted as “singing doll.” The lyrics portray her as an ingenue, that is, “an innocent or unsophisticated young woman.”

Seule, parfois je soupire
Je me dis à quoi bon
Chanter ainsi l’amour sans raison
Sans rien connaître des garçons

In English:

Alone, I sometimes sigh
Thinking, what’s the point
Of singing love like this, without reason
Without knowing anything about boys?

Gainsbourg exploited her innocence with Les Sucettes or Lollipops, which is a thinly veiled allusion to oral sex. France Gall apparently wasn’t aware of the double entendre. In this video, she talks about the humiliation she suffered when she found out the double meaning of Les Sucettes:

Next week, I will pay tribute to American singer Keely Smith, who died last month, December 2017.

#MusicMonday A #Christmas Pop #Music Playlist That Won’t Drive You Insane With Schmaltz

Over at The Federalist, James B. LaGrand writes:

If your tastes run more to popular, folk, or jazz music, there are still plenty of beautiful, creative, and moving interpretations of classic Christmas songs in a Christian vein to listen to. Here are some favorites that can serve as an antidote for unsatisfying Christmas music concerts (as well as various other sad and troubling things in our world).

Source: Here’s A Christmas Pop Music Playlist That Won’t Drive You Insane With Schmaltz

Merry Christmas from Cold Cream 'n' Roses

Merry Christmas from Cold Cream ‘n’ Roses

The article includes videos for James LaGrand’s eight chosen songs, but I put those songs into a Spotify playlist:

#MusicMonday Nat King Cole “The #Christmas Song”

In tribute to the holidays, here is Nat “King” Cole singing “The Christmas Song”, better known by its opening lines:

Chestnuts roasting on an open fire

via https://www.facebook.com/natkingcole/posts/10155089032158807

The Christmas Song was written by Mel Tormé, a crooner in his own right, and Bob Wells.  It is among the Top 10 Christmas songs written by Jews, from ‘Silver Bells’ to ‘Let It Snow, Let It Snow, Let It Snow.”

 

#MusicMonday Lonelyville Della Reese #RIP – from Let’s Rock 1958

Della Reese died on Sunday, November 19, 2017 at age 86.  Invariably, any news about her death mentioned Touched by an Angel, but she had a long and varied career before that.

Here’s a surprisingly vampish Della Reese singing Lonelyville, from the 1958 movie Let’s Rock: