#MusicMonday France Gall #France

France Gall was a French pop singer, one of the yé-yé girls of the 1960s, which included Françoise Hardy and Sylvie Vartan. She died earlier this month, on January 7, 2018, of an infection from cancer. She was age 70.

She shot to prominence when she won the Eurovision Song Contest in 1965, singing Serge Gainsbourg’s song Poupée de cire, poupée de son (wax doll, rag doll):

Wikipedia dissects the meaning of the lyrics of Poupée de cire, poupée de son: for example, poupée de son can also be interpreted as “singing doll.” The lyrics portray her as an ingenue, that is, “an innocent or unsophisticated young woman.”

Seule, parfois je soupire
Je me dis à quoi bon
Chanter ainsi l’amour sans raison
Sans rien connaître des garçons

In English:

Alone, I sometimes sigh
Thinking, what’s the point
Of singing love like this, without reason
Without knowing anything about boys?

Gainsbourg exploited her innocence with Les Sucettes or Lollipops, which is a thinly veiled allusion to oral sex. France Gall apparently wasn’t aware of the double entendre. In this video, she talks about the humiliation she suffered when she found out the double meaning of Les Sucettes:

Next week, I will pay tribute to American singer Keely Smith, who died last month, December 2017.

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One thought on “#MusicMonday France Gall #France

  1. Pingback: #MusicMonday Keely Smith “When Day is Done” | Cold Cream 'n' Roses

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